Sniwali

Discussion in 'Filipino Martial Arts' started by Sherratt, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    was wondering if anyone had some good siniwali drills that could be done without a training partner since sadly and unfortunitly i dont have one. ive gotten the hang of the hevan 6 drill and ive also gotten the hang of the 2nd and 3rd drill in this video which i quite like and ive tried and didnt really like the other ones so were on the same page and from whatb i can see the second drill starts at move 12 in (i think ) a twin outrer forarm block

    was looking for some more which im sure are out there that i havent found. i have two sticks, one heavy and 1 medium (i havent been able to find a pair for my heavy unfortunitly) and a pear of training knives
     
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  3. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    You can do any sinwali drills without a partner. Are you just looking for different combinations to practice?
     
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  4. thegerm78

    thegerm78 Initiate

    Hang a tire in the backyard and hit the tire on each strike. It will give you good feedback on if you are performing the strikes right, if you have the right body alignment, and if you are using the correct footwork to work the strikes.

    You'll want to hang it vertically, about head level. It's good practice with single stick too.
     
  5. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    yeah, mainly looking for different combinations to practice at this stage. not particuarly fussed if its with single stick or doubble stick
     
  6. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    and sadly as far as im awear theres no FMA clubs neer were i live
     
  7. MA_JD

    MA_JD Disciple

    There is one I have done we termed a double sinwali.
    Start: Left stick under Right armpit pointing behind you (palm down). Right hand, stick pointing behind palm facing your ear.
    1. Strike right forehand strike to temple, ending palm down by left ear.
    2. Left backhand strike to temple , ending palm facing left ear, stick pointed behind.
    3. Backhand strike with Right hand to temple and recoil tucking under left arm. (should end reverse starting position)
    4. repeat Left, Right , Left
    *want pattern to flow continuously with no pauses.

    Can be done double stick: All 3 strikes to temple, ribs, or knees. Or mixing striks high, medium, low, low, medium, high.
    Also, Single stick and one empty hand & 2 empty hands.
     
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  8. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    I need to start making videos of stick and knife combos. I like to do single stick drills with a lot of action with the live hand.
     
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  9. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    I have been doing that, its a good one. I've gotten the hang of it preforming it in the air, i just havent gotten around to rigging something like a tire up to devlope power
     
  10. MA_JD

    MA_JD Disciple

    Gottcha. Too bad you don't have a partner, doubles are fun to do with another person and were the cause of my 3 month long cracked knuckle. Needless to say I kept getting hit every couple weeks. hahaha.
     
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  11. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    Haha! That exact pattern and other similar drills irritated me as they have you in an inherently weak position (stick under arm). But as a general coordination and familiarization drill it has merit. That along with other less than useful techniques such as fanning (abaninko to some practitioners) that would be drilled yet never utilized in sparring...

    The tire suggestion is great and can cost nothing if you find a junked tire. When you're drilling always remember most of the "power" for a stick strike comes from the wrist (very basic, but it's easy to drift into swinging with the arms when you're alone). Some instructors may tell you to envision the stick as a blade at all times, but that's silly (to put it nicely). A stick is a stick and a blade is a blade and each has it's strengths and weaknesses. Envisioning it as a blade will detract from maximizing it's strengths as a stick as you will think more about the stroke (of the blade) rather than the strike.
     
  12. MA_JD

    MA_JD Disciple

    I can partially agree to this. Haha. I wasn't a fan of having the stick under my arm, but when we got to drills empty handed with a partner punching, it kind of made more sense. Top hand block, bottom comes from under arm grabs their wrist and pulls to either pull into the last strike or into a sweep/takedown. Would I use it in a fight? Probably not, but it was a neat skill to learn in the eventuality that I may end up just reacting and tying my hands up.
     
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  13. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple



    I particuarly like the part figure 8 one in this video. simple, plenty of usable unarmed applications, good exercise when done fast with power and meditative when done slowly and relaxed over a longer period of time
     
  14. thegerm78

    thegerm78 Initiate

    I’d have to disagree with the comment made about thinking of a stick as a long blade. This is an especially good tactic to use on newbies because sometimes they swing the stick like a tennis racket! They are swinging with the side of the “blade” with no body alignment and no power behind the strike. It is useful to visualize when hitting the tire too. I will give to you that the actual application can get lost, if you were ever in the situation because with a blade you would want to strike with the middle of the blade and with a stick you want to strike with the tip of the stick.

    But since the OP does not have a teacher, trying to learn double stick is pretty useless. I would advise him to work on developing his power and speed on the tire. If he wants to try sinawali or some other double stick drill that’s cool just try it, but stick to the basics until you get a teacher. Then when you start your studies you won’t have to waste that much time on the basics and can learn the right way to do double stick.
     
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  15. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    I am not sure how much truth there is to it but I was told the reason that we tuck one under the arm is to practice drawing. This was practical since a machete could be worn on one's back and on on the hip.
     
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  16. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    Agreed. Stick work and knife work look similar but they are different. Like you said, your power with a stick is on the end and you would strike with V shaped patterns. You strike with the blade in the middle and cut on the pull.
     
  17. RJ Clark

    RJ Clark Tree Ninja Staff Member

    This is the reason why you should be agreeing with me:p
    This is also why I told him to not swing with the arms but rather to snap the stick strikes with the wrist.

    One of the best ways to victimize someone when your sparring with a stick/s is by coming off their centerline to get in on them if infighting (corto mano or whatever you like to call it) is a strength, which for me it is. So I love it when guys start playing with patterns rather than just acting and reacting spontaneously. As soon as a hand/arm "flows" across their body they've given up their centerline on that side without me even having to move, so I can just touch/tap/hold and get inside.

    Def stroke a blade and snap a stick. I could go further with some wordsmithing and say that stickwork uses transitional flow (flowing from one distinct strike to the next) whereas bladework has flowing target transitions (it should all look like one continuous cut from one target to the next).
     
  18. Aaron Hutto

    Aaron Hutto Master

    My Guru used to say that both training were equally important because stick work teaches you power and blade work teaches you flow and you are a very dangerous person when you have both.
     
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  19. Nexquietus

    Nexquietus Disciple

    I guess I'll counter Aaron's above comment by saying my instructor says that if you train with the blade and become proficient with it, you will be able to adapt to whatever is at hand. I'll admit that I have not trained other FMA styles, but in the Pekiti Tersia that I have learned over the last 3 years we train all movements are the same, unarmed, knife, stick, staff, or sword. We regularly train power and focus on edge alignment both with sticks or Poly sword trainers on BOBs or each other's sticks.

    Why wouldn't training with a blade generate power? If you keep your stick perfectly perpendicular to your forearm and keep aware of edge alignment, perform a good follow through, start with your hips, etc, how is that bad when you have a stick? The blade is the harder thing to learn, yes? Do that first. Then it doesn't matter what you have. You don't need to think, "Oh shit, this is a blade, i gotta make sure I keep the edge aligned." or Man, this sword is sharp, but if I had a stick I could generate some power. you think, "well, at least I have a weapon."

    I know the original post was about siniwali, but I had to chime in on this. I may start another thread about this in a bit.

    As for the Siniwali, check out youtube and invest in a large mirror. It sounds lame, but if it's what you got. The mirror will also help you visualize your targets and striking lines etc.

    jim
     
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  20. Sherratt

    Sherratt Disciple

    Youtube was pretty much the first place I checked. some good stuff but not a lot of good basic solo drills that I could find. quite a lot of the same sort of stuff

    Thats the idea. mainly looking at coordination at the moment since I dont have a tire or anything like that rigged up to develop power yet
     
  21. thegerm78

    thegerm78 Initiate

    Since you don't have a tire don't do like some people and start hitting metal playground equipment or full grown tree trunks. You need an object that will 'give' a little when you strike it.
     

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