How to fight a style

Discussion in 'Mixed Martial Arts' started by GoldDan, Jan 1, 2017.

  1. GoldDan

    GoldDan Founder of Neo-Bokator, supreme master Dan.

    Really short, really fast, this is how I would deal with the most common styles, let me see if you guys agree or differ.

    Boxing
    Bob and weave into clinch range, turn it into a clinch, then let elbows punish his lack of knowledge on where to place his arms.

    Taekwondo
    Run in behind his chamber, so that I am to close to get kicked, then take him down and turn it into a bjj match.

    Kickboxing
    A mix of the tactics against boxing and taekwondo

    Muay Thai
    Defend the clinch until I can find an opening to throw him, especially off the underhook when he goes for inside grip on my head, perhaps a hip toss from there, then submit him from the ground where he has less knowledge.

    Wrestling
    Control his takedowns using sprawls and such, establish some sort of guard, transition into guard designed for keeping his posture broken. Use his lack of understanding submissions to find openings for submissions, setting him up with elbows from guards where you have a hand free.

    BJJ
    Use a mixture of clinch and wrestling to defend my posture, so I can make it about the clinch and ground and pound, instead of playing into his entaglement based system.

    Judo
    Stop the throw early and keep him in the thai clinch, raining in knees and elbows, using his lack of understanding where to place his arms for a good defence in a muay thai clinch.

    What are your thoughts?

    What style do you think is hardest to fight?
     
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  3. Master of Nothing

    Master of Nothing Psychotic Pacifist

    I can agree that these approaches are good advice. Depending on the severity of the situation, I would add:

    Boxing
    Fain one way, then break the knee, or groin strike and then break the knee

    Taekwondo
    Catching the chamber with a push block to negate the attack. Or trap the leg and break the opposite knee. Stop Kicks are great for this.

    Kickboxing
    A mix of the tactics against boxing and taekwondo. Attacking the limbs to destroy their weapons are usually a good idea again sport focused strikers.

    Muay Thai
    Understand the timing of their kicking style to close distance or attack the legs. There is always a point in which the dedication of weight to momentum is finite. Once that is identified, go for the ACL.
    For infighting, watch for rising knees and downward elbows. Then it is a matter of targeting soft targets, before, during after, or instead of going to the ground.

    Wrestling
    Ears. Grab, Drop the Elbow, and Tear. Most of the time the ear does not actually rip off (despite what the movies say), but they will hang from a line of flesh that has stretched.

    BJJ
    Crush Crawling. When you are the ground with someone, many times vulnerable areas not addressed by pure grappling. "Alternative" grappling systems such as Chin Na are more focused on severing soft tissue targets to debilitate your opponent than their submission.

    Judo
    Once grabbed, latch in on their body to negate the throw (involves some weight shifting), reach for the eyes and blind them.

    Ultimately, for survival it is important to become an Eyes, Ears, Nose, Throat, Groin, and Muscle Cluster & Tendon specialist. If someone wants to "beat" you, Hurt them. If they want to "Submit" you, Damage them. If they want to kill you, Destroy them.
    Even the "toughest" fighters are used to only a few types of pain. Change what type of pain they experience and they will squeal. Once that happens, then they are open to a number of gross and mean things that will become a life changing experience for them.

    Disclaimer: Although I do believe that having the ability to permanently alter an attack's quality of life and/or ending it is a necessity for any practical self-protection skill set. I also advocate the proper education on how to measure the proper response to an attacker, because not every attacker will be a life and death enemy.

    Additional Note: Even if the opponent is not a life/death attacker, application of soft tissue attacks to a lesser degree of severity can induce extreme pain without doing permanent damage. These can either be used as a complete tactic and/or as a supplimentary tactic to assist in beating the living hell out of that person.
     
  4. GoldDan

    GoldDan Founder of Neo-Bokator, supreme master Dan.

    There is no way to practise most of the things that you mentioned in its actual form. Who sends their kid into that?

    Boxing
    Breaking the knee must be modified into low-kick for sparring. Groin strike must be modified to inside leg kick and front kick to the body.

    Taekwondo
    Catching the chamber could quickly become rushing into the kick, a lot of taekwondo guys disguise their turn kick as a spinning hook kick, you would be running into a potential liver shot, I don't think this is the best way to go about it, it seems better to trade their kick to get into a better distance, this mindset also allows you to grab the leg and do a sweep. This type of sweet would build routines similar to the ones needed to break the knee the way you wanted to.

    Kickboxing
    If we are talking about a ruleset that allows it, or a pure self defence situation, I agree with this. If you can avoid putting your head into the range, just swat whatever punch or kick he throws at you by elbowing his legs and hammerfisting his amrs, you're off to a good start.

    Muay Thai
    While it is true that they often pause to set up their kick by taking a step to the side, they stutter step and shift their legs to change up the rythm. I wouldn't get into that game unless I could see the guy was less experiences than me. I wouldn't go into the kick before it reach maximum power either, because they counter that very effectively with clinch, knees and elbows. I would opt for Judo. Using the calf is illegal in Muay Thai, do I could easily see them accidentally walking into an O goshi or O soto gari because they've never had to defend from it. But yeah, you need to know how the elbows will be comming in suring the clincj, know when he is pulling and pushing on your arm what he is going to do. Also, headbutt is nice from the clinch. Most muay thai matches forbid the use of headbutts.

    Wrestling
    I am very much in favour pinching when it comes to self defense. You can even get some practise in this from grabbing the gi during grappling. Also, many wrestlers use their head to ram in with, to aid their takedown, thus they are exposed to knees and punches to the chin. A wrestler wants to rush in, because if he can get you to lean back for a second, that will be enough time for him to secure the throw and slam you to the ground. So good posture leaning over the knee would be crucial for defense.

    BJJ
    Actually many guard passes do target more vulnerable areas. There is one that slides the knee between the butt cheeks, over the genitals, then pushes you up, breaking the guard, while crushing your opponents groin. You also have the canopener neck crank. I think that one is your best option, because you can't be in his guard while his friend might kick you in the face. So can-opener combined with striking on your way out of the guard. Very do-able in Neo-Bokator sparring.

    Judo
    Hmm, a good judoka might use his ukemi to throw himself with you, and land on you, slamming you flat on your back with his wheight. Basicly, I don't want to play the martial artists game, I want them to have to go along with doing something they don't have much practise dealing with. Even if I am better than them at their own game, they will still fight me because they're doing something they're comfortable with. But when they eat a couple of elbows in the clinch and spend most of their time outside of it getting stung by punches they don't know how to block, and constant leg kicks, it breaks their spirit, because they feel they are doing something they're not good at.

    It is like I said with the BJJ guys who visited our club. They came in there to "expose" the fake master. Then we got into sparring and they realized we were gonna use headbutts and all sorts of stuff they've never tried before, and they emediatly went "I just wanna roll bruh". Jeez, how the mighty have fallen.
     

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